☰ MENU

Second Chance Garage

For the Classic Car Restoration Enthusiast

Second Chance Garage


Second Chance Garage

For the Classic Car Restoration Enthusiast

Second Chance Garage

Second Chance Garage

For the Classic Car Restoration Enthusiast

Second Chance Garage

HOW-TO

Installing Braided Stainless Steel Brake Lines — Page 2

Here are our three braided stainless steel hoses. The two shorter ones are for the front brakes. Longer hose is for the rear of the car.

Here are our three braided stainless steel hoses. The two shorter ones are for the front brakes. Longer hose is for the rear of the car.


The first thing we did is lay out the three new brake hoses. Two of them were the same size and one was longer. We wanted to absolutely verify that the two slightly shorter hoses were for each side up front. This was the logical case, but over the years we have seen cars with some pretty weird things. A peek in the Victoria British catalog for TR7/TR8 parts confirmed that the TR8 takes three brake hoses and that the front two have the same part number. This told us that the front brake hoses for this car are definitely the same length.

We peeked in a Victoria British parts catalog to double check that both front brake hoses were the same size. They were the same part number.

We peeked in a Victoria British parts catalog to double check that both front brake hoses were the same size. They were the same part number.


-
The lengths of the new hoses should closely match the length of the hoses on the car. As you can see, this was the case with the hoses we ordered.

The lengths of the new hoses should closely match the length of the hoses on the car. As you can see, this was the case with the hoses we ordered.


Once you can move the old nut up the brake line, you can separate the brake line from the threaded nipple type brake hose connection.

Once you can move the old nut up the brake line, you can separate the brake line from the threaded nipple type brake hose connection.


After checking that the length of the two hoses was the same and that their lengths matched those of the old rubber hoses, we began to remove the hoses by undoing the connection. This required two wrenches, one to turn the nut that attaches the hoses to the brake lines and one to keep the nut on the hoses stationary. Since brake line fittings and hose fittings are made of relatively soft metal, they can be easily ruined by a regular open-end wrench — a six-point brake line wrench (also known as a flare wrench) is recommended. You can get a pretty good set of these at Harbor Freight or Northern Tool for a very reasonable price.

data-matched-content-ui-type="image_card_stacked" data-matched-content-rows-num="4,2" data-matched-content-columns-num="1,4" data-ad-format="autorelaxed">