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Second Chance Garage

For the Classic Car
Restoration Enthusiast

Second Chance Garage

Second Chance Garage

For the Classic Car
Restoration Enthusiast

Second Chance Garage

Second Chance Garage

For the Classic Car Restoration Enthusiast

Second Chance Garage

HOW-TO

Installing Braided Stainless Steel Brake Lines — Page 3

Always use a six-point flare wrench to loosen an/or tighten the hose and line connections. Various sizes are required for different nuts.

Always use a six-point flare wrench to loosen an/or tighten the hose and line connections. Various sizes are required for different nuts.


The ends of the six-point flare wrenches slide over the brake line and onto the huts, giving a firm grip that won't tear up the soft metal nuts.

The ends of the six-point flare wrenches slide over the brake line and onto the huts, giving a firm grip that won't tear up the soft metal nuts.


Once the nuts that attach the brake hoses to the brake lines are completely loosened, they can be slid up the line so the hose-to-line connection can be broken. On our particular project, the brake lines had been undercoated and the protective black covering kept the nut from sliding upwards. We used a razor blade to scrape the undercoating off. We'll protect the lines against rust using another product called Rust Prevention Magic that we've written about before on this Website.

We used a razor blade to clean up the short brake line because it had too much old undercoating on It. The nut could not be slid upwards for clearance.

We used a razor blade to clean up the short brake line because it had too much old undercoating on It. The nut could not be slid upwards for clearance.


We removed the old rubber hose on the passenger side of the car with the short brake line that runs to the front brake caliper still attached. There were star washers around the brake hose nipples and we wanted to make certain that we knew the order in which the parts are to be assembled. By leaving the driver's side brake hose connected, we had a model to guide us. We could have also made drawings or taken digital photos or referenced the factory parts manual that has coloring-book-like illustrations of all TR7/TR8 parts and how they go together.

Top to bottom are the short line that runs to the brake caliper, the old rubber brake hose and the new braided stainless steel brake hose.

Top to bottom are the short line that runs to the brake caliper, the old rubber brake hose and the new braided stainless steel brake hose.


Once we had all the parts removed, we wire brushed all of the fittings until they were shining. We also wire brushed the short brake pipe that goes to the caliper. These parts also got the Rust Prevention Magic treatment. Then we put everything back together using the new braided stainless steel brake hoses. The end result is a nice-looking brake hose system that won't rust.

With re-useable pieces cleaned up, here's how the front brake line and hose looked. Connections will be tightened fully when end pieces are positioned.

With re-useable pieces cleaned up, here's how the front brake line and hose looked. Connections will be tightened fully when end pieces are positioned.


Advantages of Braided Stainless Steel Brake Hoses:

  • Pedal feels firmer upon application.
  • Braking response to pedal pressure is quicker.
  • More precise brake modulation.
  • Non-hydroscopic' resists moisture.
  • Shorter stopping distance due to shorter reaction time.
  • High pressure (up to 4500 PSI) testing.
  • Factory-like fit.
  • O.T. compliant.

Disadvantages of Braided Stainless Steel Brake Hoses

  • Non-original look.
  • More expensive.