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Second Chance Garage

For the Classic Car Restoration Enthusiast

Second Chance Garage


Second Chance Garage

For the Classic Car Restoration Enthusiast

Second Chance Garage

Second Chance Garage

For the Classic Car Restoration Enthusiast

Second Chance Garage

PRODUCT REVIEWS

Turn Signals for Collector Classic Cars: Turnswitch from S&M Electro-Tech — Page 3

Photo 1 — Pictured is the Turnswitch controller that would normally mount under or behind the dash board. The strip connector makes it easy to make the necessary screw connections and disconnects if the controller requires servicing.

Photo 1 — Pictured is the Turnswitch controller that would normally mount under or behind the dash board. The strip connector makes it easy to make the necessary screw connections and disconnects if the controller requires servicing.


Photo 2 — The Turn Signal Switch is the means the driver uses to signal his turns, much like a turn signal on a modern car. It mounts to the column using a clamp. It includes a simple connector that disconnects from the controller (handy if you want to remove it while at a show).

Photo 2 — The Turn Signal Switch is the means the driver uses to signal his turns, much like a turn signal on a modern car. It mounts to the column using a clamp. It includes a simple connector that disconnects from the controller (handy if you want to remove it while at a show).


Photo 3 — An accessory indicator can be made and integrated into the wiring to visually alert the driver. This indicator was made using Light Emitting Diodes (LED) inside an aluminum block and is held onto the dash using a strong magnet.

Photo 3 — An accessory indicator can be made and integrated into the wiring to visually alert the driver. This indicator was made using Light Emitting Diodes (LED) inside an aluminum block and is held onto the dash using a strong magnet.


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Photo 4 — The hose clamp that comes with the Turn Signal Switch (Photo 2) can be a little unsightly. A more elegant mounting uses thin aluminum strips and wings nuts. The switch can be quickly removed once at a show if the driver chooses.

Photo 4 — The hose clamp that comes with the Turn Signal Switch (Photo 2) can be a little unsightly. A more elegant mounting uses thin aluminum strips and wings nuts. The switch can be quickly removed once at a show if the driver chooses.


Photo 5 — Rear view of a 1930 Lincoln Touring. The car originally came with only one tail light (from the TRILIN Company) on the driver's side. As the name implies the three lens light are 1) Clear for Reverse, 2), Amber for Stop, and 3) Red For taillight. This car was restored using another TRILIN tail light to permit the use of the turn signals and added stop and tail lights. Adding the second TRILIN light for safety with no point deduction during judging.

Photo 5 — Rear view of a 1930 Lincoln Touring. The car originally came with only one tail light (from the TRILIN Company) on the driver's side. As the name implies the three lens light are 1) Clear for Reverse, 2), Amber for Stop, and 3) Red For taillight. This car was restored using another TRILIN tail light to permit the use of the turn signals and added stop and tail lights. Adding the second TRILIN light for safety with no point deduction during judging.


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