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Second Chance Garage

For the Classic Car
Restoration Enthusiast

Second Chance Garage

Second Chance Garage

For the Classic Car
Restoration Enthusiast

Second Chance Garage

Second Chance Garage

For the Classic Car Restoration Enthusiast

Second Chance Garage

FEATURE ARTICLES

1937 Buick Special Business Coupe: A Restoration Journal — Part 26 - Page 3

By the time I had the emergency brake system worked out my wheel cylinders came back from Apple. I chose to have them sleeved and fully rebuilt so I simply had to bolt them in place. When I reconnected and bled the lines I discovered a few leaks. While some of the leaks were due to loose connections, both of my rear lines were leaking at the wheel cylinders. My flares looked ok but the fittings showed signs of corrosion. I made some new lines, repeated the bleeding procedure and (eventually) my brake system was leak free and provided great stopping power.

Rebuilt wheel cylinders find their new home.

Rebuilt wheel cylinders find their new home.


In between the leaks and brake issues I installed the car's seats and added insulation to the rear deck area and inside of the roof. Dynamat will soon be installed under the floor mats, replacing the jute and fiberboard that was originally installed in 1937.

I also turned my attention to reassembling my doors and this turned out to be quite a jigsaw puzzle for me! I disassembled the doors three years ago and took dozens of pictures and scribbled a few notes. Unfortunately, for reassembly, I needed even more pictures and better notes.

Those pictures and notes couldn't be found in Buick's Shop Manual so I started experimenting with reassembly. What I should have done, especially as the librarian of the greatest automotive library in the world, was found another reference. Had I taken the time to flip through the Fisher Body Manual of Construction and Service I would have found the step by step instructions I needed. Alas, excitement got the best of me.

After several attempts, I eventually figured out that the correct order for door assembly is:

  1. Door latch assembly
  2. Main window regulator assembly
  3. Wind regulator down, insert and connect main glass to regulator
  4. Vent window channel, glass and regulator as one unit.
  5. Final main window run channel
  6. Weather-stripping

Once this order is established, a door can be assembled in under one hour. If you don't know this order...well...it takes a little longer.

Behind the door panels you can see the window regulators and interior door handle regulator.

Behind the door panels you can see the window regulators and interior door handle regulator.


New glass, fresh chrome and new vent weatherstrip makes a tight fit.

New glass, fresh chrome and new vent weatherstrip makes a tight fit.